Of blood and bone book

8.11  ·  9,418 ratings  ·  635 reviews
of blood and bone book

Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orïsha, #1) by Tomi Adeyemi

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Published 03.01.2019

Tomi Adeyemi's Children of Blood and Bone Is an Epic Allegory About the Black Experience

Of Blood and Bone book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The #1 New York Times bestselling author of the epic Year One.

Children of Blood and Bone

A thoroughly dissappointing read. Before i dive into this review, i'd just like to say that i did like the premise of this book. I liked the fact that Tomi wanted to explore Yoruba mythology, i also absolutely loved the fact that she wanted to put Nigeria not just as a place representing Africa as a whole but a country with it's unique culture and all that - she failed in that though , but hey at least she didn't do the whole Africa is a country thing. First of: Adeyemi had a chance really to pro. First of: Adeyemi had a chance really to properly explore yoruba mythology and you know just educate people but somewhere along the line everything started looking like a rebooted Netflix Version of your fave animie. Who is that?

The seven-figure book advance and movie deal bestowed a year ago on Tomi Adeyemi suggest the opposite: a convergence of themes likely to appeal to a very wide audience. Adeyemi, whose Children of Blood and Bone is the first volume of a projected trilogy, is a year-old newcomer to the thriving market of young-adult literature, where demands for greater diversity of authorship and subject matter have lately been loud and clear. Instead, her high-profile debut calls attention to an underheralded tradition. For at least five decades, writers such as Samuel Delany and Octavia Butler, among other leading figures of the movement known as Afrofuturism, have worked African traditions into their prize-winning science fiction and fantasy. More recently, legends of the orishas—divine spirits of the Yoruba brought to the New World by slave ships centuries ago—have found their way into YA fare. They have been put there by black writers well aware that speculative fiction has always been about more than magic and clever devices.

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